On this day November 26, 1942

Josip Broz Tito and the Yugoslav Partisans convened the first meeting of the Anti-Fascist Council of National Liberation of Yugoslavia at Bihać in northwestern Bosnia in the hope of gaining political legitimacy.

Josip Broz Tito

The AVNOJ (Antifašističko V(ij)eće Narodnog Oslobođenja Jugoslavije), standing for “Anti-Fascist Council of National Liberation of Yugoslavia”, was the political umbrella organization for the people’s liberation committees that was established to administer territories under their control.

It was under the political leadership of the main resistance forces of Yugoslavia, during the Axis occupation of World War II.

Comprising a committee of both the communist and non-communist Partisan representatives, under Josip Broz Tito, AVNOJ proclaimed support for: democracy; the rights of ethnic minorities; the inviolability of private property; and freedom of individual economic initiative for the different groups.

AVNOJ (Antifašističko V(ij)eće Narodnog Oslobođenja Jugoslavije), standing for “Anti-Fascist Council of National Liberation of Yugoslavia”, was the political umbrella organization for the people’s liberation committees that was established on November 26, 1942 to administer terrorities under their control. It was under the political leadership of the main resistance forces of Yugoslavia, during the Axis occupation of World War II.

In December 1943, Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin decided to support the Partisans. The United Kingdom joined a month later, and stopped supplying the Chetniks. The first Soviet mission arrived at Partisan headquarters, shortly thereafter. The United States kept a military mission with Mihajlović to encourage continued Chetnik aid for downed American fliers.

In May 1944, German airborne forces attacked Tito’s headquarters in Drvar, nearly capturing him. Tito fled to Italy, and established a new headquarters on the Adriatic island of Vis. After throwing its full support to the Partisans, Britain worked to reconcile Tito and Petar. At Britain’s urging, Petar agreed to remain outside Yugoslavia, and in September, summoned all Yugoslavs to back the Partisans.

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