On this day March 15, 1917

Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule.

Nikolai Alexandrovich Romanov

Nikolai Alexandrovich Romanov

Nikolai Alexandrovich Romanov (Никола́й II, Никола́й Алекса́ндрович Рома́нов) was the last Emperor of Russia, Grand Duke of Finland, and claimant to the title of King of Poland.

His official title was Nicholas II, Emperor and Autocrat of All the Russias[2] and he is currently regarded as Saint Nicholas the Passion Bearer by the Russian Orthodox Church.

Nicholas II ruled from 1894 until his abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw Imperial Russia go from being one of the foremost great powers of the world to an economic and military disaster.

Critics nicknamed him Bloody Nicholas because of the Khodynka Tragedy, Bloody Sunday, and his largely fatal anti-Semitic pogroms. As head of state, he approved the Russian mobilization of August 1914 which marked the first fatal step into World War I and thus into the demise of the Romanov dynasty.

Nicholas II abdicated following the February Revolution of 1917 during which he and his family were imprisoned first in the Alexander Palace at Tsarskoe Selo, then later in the Governor’s Mansion in Tobolsk, and finally at the Ipatiev House in Yekaterinburg.

Nicholas II, his wife, his son, his four daughters, the family’s medical doctor, his personal servant, the Empress’ chambermaid and the family’s cook were all killed in the same room by the Bolsheviks on the night of 17 July 1918.

It is now well documented that this event had been orchestrated from Moscow by Lenin and the Bolshevik leader Yakov Sverdlov. This has led to the late Nicholas II, his wife the Empress and their children to be canonized as martyrs by various groups tied to the Russian Orthodox Church within Russia and, prominently, by the Russian Orthodox Church outside Russia.

Tags:

%d bloggers like this: